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LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2

Resilience – More Than a Buzzword

Each year, the publisher of the Webster’s dictionary comes out with a list of “Words of the Year” – buzzwords that are determined by polls, page hits and user suggestions. While we’re only mid-way through 2018, I think it’s evident that in the utility sector the word of the year is Resilience.

Historically, transmission planning has focused on electric reliability, or reducing the probability of power interruptions and outages. Resiliency, on the other hand, is the ability of a power system to withstand or quickly recover from disruptive events such as a sudden wind storm or physical attack. Although the two terms often are used interchangeably, they are not the same.

ITC’s grid resilience efforts focus on system performance, where specific investments are made to avoid any one facility from becoming so critical that a single system problem cascades to additional outages. Redundancy in the transmission system – the existence of multiple pathways to connect electricity to customers – offers perhaps the best path toward strengthening the reliable transfer of power generation to customers.

As society becomes increasingly dependent on reliable electric power to meet our evolving energy use and demand, grid resilience will only become more important. The changing energy generation mix, innovations like automated and electric vehicles, and weather events such as ice storms, wind events and summer heat waves…all of this adds up to increased stress on electric transmission infrastructure that was largely built decades ago, without the technology inputs of today and tomorrow in mind.  

Transmission projects that can strengthen the grid’s resilience to such threats will result in a more robust grid to meet customers’ needs. But it takes time to plan such projects, so it’s critical that we maintain a sense of urgency when it comes to creating a proactive planning environment to build more resilience into the transmission grid. Studies have shown that a proactive approach to planning can deliver millions in benefits to customers above and beyond the benefits of a resilient grid.

As we continue to move towards a greener, cleaner energy future, increasing consumer demands for reliability, accessibility and affordable energy, and the need to protect our infrastructure, we must act now at the state, regional and national level to collaborate on the necessary policies to plan and facilitate a robust and resilient transmission grid to meet our future energy needs.

Clearly, grid resilience is much more than a buzzword.

Sincerely,

itc-presidentbe31a37532376c5b9373ff64003dc3d8

Simon S. Whitelocke
Vice President, ITC Holdings Corp. and President, ITC Michigan

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MISO Study Queue Tops 13,000 MW Dominated by Wind and Solar

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


As the industry looks at Michigan’s long-term energy future, an unprecedented number of wind and solar projects are being proposed by power producers to meet the state’s future energy needs. Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO), the regional transmission operator that oversees energy delivery in 15 states, is currently reviewing 32 generator interconnection requests in Lower Michigan as part of MISO’s generator interconnection study process.  Additionally, there are 36 projects in Lower Michigan waiting to be studied. In total, there are 34 solar and 27 wind projects. As these generators advance through the study process, unit owners will be provided decision points to continue with the study process at the end of each of the three study cycles. Successful owners will execute a Generator Interconnection Agreement (GIA) with ITC, which will commence ITC’s work on constructing facilities needed to interconnect the generator.  

In total, these projects represent more than 13,000 Megawatts (MW) of prospective generation; an amount that is greater than 50% of Lower Michigan’s peak load.  “It’s an interesting phenomenon right now. The energy landscape is truly changing,” says ITC Director of Planning Chuck Marshall. “In recent years we have witnessed a buildout of generation in Michigan’s Thumb region, yet a majority of the queue today is siting generation in other rural areas of our state.  It appears the recent retirement of legacy coal fired resources coupled with renewed renewable goals and tax credits are driving more solar and wind projects than we’ve ever seen proposed in the past, while queue reform is driving an unusually high number of projects into the MISO queue. While the outcome is unknown, ITC remains committed to integrating these diverse energy resources and providing our customers a reliable and secure connection.”

Learn more about the projects in the MISO Generator Interconnection Queue on their website.




MISO Study Queue Tops 13,000 MW Dominated by Wind and Solar

As the industry looks at Michigan’s long-term energy future, an unprecedented number of wind and solar projects are being proposed by power producers to meet the state’s future energy needs. Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO), the regional transmission operator that oversees energy delivery in 15 states, is currently reviewing 32 generator interconnection requests in Lower Michigan as part of MISO’s generator interconnection study process.  Additionally, there are 36 projects in Lower Michigan waiting to be studied. In total, there are 34 solar and 27 wind projects. As these generators advance through the study process, unit owners will be provided decision points to continue with the study process at the end of each of the three study cycles. Successful owners will execute a Generator Interconnection Agreement (GIA) with ITC, which will commence ITC’s work on constructing facilities needed to interconnect the generator.  

In total, these projects represent more than 13,000 Megawatts (MW) of prospective generation; an amount that is greater than 50% of Lower Michigan’s peak load.  “It’s an interesting phenomenon right now. The energy landscape is truly changing,” says ITC Director of Planning Chuck Marshall. “In recent years we have witnessed a buildout of generation in Michigan’s Thumb region, yet a majority of the queue today is siting generation in other rural areas of our state.  It appears the recent retirement of legacy coal fired resources coupled with renewed renewable goals and tax credits are driving more solar and wind projects than we’ve ever seen proposed in the past, while queue reform is driving an unusually high number of projects into the MISO queue. While the outcome is unknown, ITC remains committed to integrating these diverse energy resources and providing our customers a reliable and secure connection.”

Learn more about the projects in the MISO Generator Interconnection Queue on their website.




MISO Study Queue Tops 13,000 MW Dominated by Wind and Solar

As the industry looks at Michigan’s long-term energy future, an unprecedented number of wind and solar projects are being proposed by power producers to meet the state’s future energy needs. Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO), the regional transmission operator that oversees energy delivery in 15 states, is currently reviewing 32 generator interconnection requests in Lower Michigan as part of MISO’s generator interconnection study process.  Additionally, there are 36 projects in Lower Michigan waiting to be studied. In total, there are 34 solar and 27 wind projects. As these generators advance through the study process, unit owners will be provided decision points to continue with the study process at the end of each of the three study cycles. Successful owners will execute a Generator Interconnection Agreement (GIA) with ITC, which will commence ITC’s work on constructing facilities needed to interconnect the generator.  

In total, these projects represent more than 13,000 Megawatts (MW) of prospective generation; an amount that is greater than 50% of Lower Michigan’s peak load.  “It’s an interesting phenomenon right now. The energy landscape is truly changing,” says ITC Director of Planning Chuck Marshall. “In recent years we have witnessed a buildout of generation in Michigan’s Thumb region, yet a majority of the queue today is siting generation in other rural areas of our state.  It appears the recent retirement of legacy coal fired resources coupled with renewed renewable goals and tax credits are driving more solar and wind projects than we’ve ever seen proposed in the past, while queue reform is driving an unusually high number of projects into the MISO queue. While the outcome is unknown, ITC remains committed to integrating these diverse energy resources and providing our customers a reliable and secure connection.”

Learn more about the projects in the MISO Generator Interconnection Queue on their website.



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ITC Transmission: Apex-Phoenix Construction Update

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2

To support electric reliability and increase capacity in the Ann Arbor area, ITC is constructing approximately three miles of underground transmission line to connect a new DTE Energy substation named Apex, located near the intersection of Huron Parkway and Hubbard Road, to an existing substation named Phoenix, located just north of Dhu Varren Road.

During the first phase of construction earlier this year, ITC installed approx. 1,100 feet of underground duct bank, which will hold the transmission cables, along the southwest portion of the Dhu Varren – Nixon roundabout. During the second and third phases of construction, which began in April, ITC will construct approximately 2.5 miles of the underground duct bank and manhole system along Dhu Varren, Nixon and Huron Pkwy. ITC anticipates completing construction by the end of 2018 to meet the anticipated energy needs of the region. View the project profile.

 



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ITC Transmission: Apex-Phoenix Construction Update

To support electric reliability and increase capacity in the Ann Arbor area, ITC is constructing approximately three miles of underground transmission line to connect a new DTE Energy substation named Apex, located near the intersection of Huron Parkway and Hubbard Road, to an existing substation named Phoenix, located just north of Dhu Varren Road.

During the first phase of construction earlier this year, ITC installed approx. 1,100 feet of underground duct bank, which will hold the transmission cables, along the southwest portion of the Dhu Varren – Nixon roundabout. During the second and third phases of construction, which began in April, ITC will construct approximately 2.5 miles of the underground duct bank and manhole system along Dhu Varren, Nixon and Huron Pkwy. ITC anticipates completing construction by the end of 2018 to meet the anticipated energy needs of the region. View the project profile.

 



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ITC Transmission: Apex-Phoenix Construction Update

To support electric reliability and increase capacity in the Ann Arbor area, ITC is constructing approximately three miles of underground transmission line to connect a new DTE Energy substation named Apex, located near the intersection of Huron Parkway and Hubbard Road, to an existing substation named Phoenix, located just north of Dhu Varren Road.

During the first phase of construction earlier this year, ITC installed approx. 1,100 feet of underground duct bank, which will hold the transmission cables, along the southwest portion of the Dhu Varren – Nixon roundabout. During the second and third phases of construction, which began in April, ITC will construct approximately 2.5 miles of the underground duct bank and manhole system along Dhu Varren, Nixon and Huron Pkwy. ITC anticipates completing construction by the end of 2018 to meet the anticipated energy needs of the region. View the project profile.

 




METC: Amber-Donaldson Creek Rebuild Project

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2

Portions of the electric transmission grid in Michigan, including the Amber – Donaldson Creek 138,000 volt (138kV) transmission line, were built more than 50 years ago and have experienced minimal investment since that time. As a result, this line has become increasingly unreliable and costly to maintain as growing demand for electricity and outdated infrastructure technology have taxed its service capabilities, creating the potential for it to become overloaded.

The Amber –Donaldson Creek line spans Mason and Oceana Counties. ITC will rebuild approximately 20 miles of this line with new double-circuit structures and conductor (wires), providing greater reliability in this area of the state. Site preparation work will begin in fall 2018. The project is expected to be complete by mid-2019. View the project profile.



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METC: Amber-Donaldson Creek Rebuild Project

Portions of the electric transmission grid in Michigan, including the Amber – Donaldson Creek 138,000 volt (138kV) transmission line, were built more than 50 years ago and have experienced minimal investment since that time. As a result, this line has become increasingly unreliable and costly to maintain as growing demand for electricity and outdated infrastructure technology have taxed its service capabilities, creating the potential for it to become overloaded.

The Amber –Donaldson Creek line spans Mason and Oceana Counties. ITC will rebuild approximately 20 miles of this line with new double-circuit structures and conductor (wires), providing greater reliability in this area of the state. Site preparation work will begin in fall 2018. The project is expected to be complete by mid-2019. View the project profile.



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METC: Amber-Donaldson Creek Rebuild Project

Portions of the electric transmission grid in Michigan, including the Amber – Donaldson Creek 138,000 volt (138kV) transmission line, were built more than 50 years ago and have experienced minimal investment since that time. As a result, this line has become increasingly unreliable and costly to maintain as growing demand for electricity and outdated infrastructure technology have taxed its service capabilities, creating the potential for it to become overloaded.

The Amber –Donaldson Creek line spans Mason and Oceana Counties. ITC will rebuild approximately 20 miles of this line with new double-circuit structures and conductor (wires), providing greater reliability in this area of the state. Site preparation work will begin in fall 2018. The project is expected to be complete by mid-2019. View the project profile.




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ITC CHARITABLE GIVING HIGHLIGHTS

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


ITC is proud to support many 501(c)3 non-profit organizations from throughout our Michigan service territory. Our Charitable Giving Program focuses on education, environmental stewardship, health & wellness and social service organizations. ITC recently provided grants to:

Building Twentyone Leaders Advancing and Helping Communities
Champions of Tomorrow Legacy Land Conservancy
DisArt Living Arts
Forgotten Harvest Mariners Inn
Friends of the Rauchholz Memorial Library Michigan Council of Women in Technology Foundation
Girl Scouts of MI Shore to Shore Special Olympics
The Greening of Detroit Ypsilanti Youth Theatre




ITC CHARITABLE GIVING HIGHLIGHTS

ITC is proud to support many 501(c)3 non-profit organizations from throughout our Michigan service territory. Our Charitable Giving Program focuses on education, environmental stewardship, health & wellness and social service organizations. ITC recently provided grants to:

Building Twentyone Leaders Advancing and Helping Communities
Champions of Tomorrow Legacy Land Conservancy
DisArt Living Arts
Forgotten Harvest Mariners Inn
Friends of the Rauchholz Memorial Library Michigan Council of Women in Technology Foundation
Girl Scouts of MI Shore to Shore Special Olympics
The Greening of Detroit Ypsilanti Youth Theatre



ITC CHARITABLE GIVING HIGHLIGHTS

ITC is proud to support many 501(c)3 non-profit organizations from throughout our Michigan service territory. Our Charitable Giving Program focuses on education, environmental stewardship, health & wellness and social service organizations. ITC recently provided grants to:

Building Twentyone Leaders Advancing and Helping Communities
Champions of Tomorrow Legacy Land Conservancy
DisArt Living Arts
Forgotten Harvest Mariners Inn
Friends of the Rauchholz Memorial Library Michigan Council of Women in Technology Foundation
Girl Scouts of MI Shore to Shore Special Olympics
The Greening of Detroit Ypsilanti Youth Theatre


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ITC CELEBRATES ARBOR DAY

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


ITC celebrated Arbor Day with communities across Michigan. In conjunction, the company was honored with its 12th annual TreeLine USA certification.

ITC was proud to support and take part in the Michigan Arbor Day Alliance State Arbor Day Celebration at Potter Park Zoo in Lansing. More than 1,200 students from throughout mid-Michigan gathered to learn more about water, soil, trees, wildlife, and how utility lines co-exist with nature.





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ITC CELEBRATES ARBOR DAY

ITC celebrated Arbor Day with communities across Michigan. In conjunction, the company was honored with its 12th annual TreeLine USA certification.

ITC was proud to support and take part in the Michigan Arbor Day Alliance State Arbor Day Celebration at Potter Park Zoo in Lansing. More than 1,200 students from throughout mid-Michigan gathered to learn more about water, soil, trees, wildlife, and how utility lines co-exist with nature.




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ITC CELEBRATES ARBOR DAY

ITC celebrated Arbor Day with communities across Michigan. In conjunction, the company was honored with its 12th annual TreeLine USA certification.

ITC was proud to support and take part in the Michigan Arbor Day Alliance State Arbor Day Celebration at Potter Park Zoo in Lansing. More than 1,200 students from throughout mid-Michigan gathered to learn more about water, soil, trees, wildlife, and how utility lines co-exist with nature.



ITC Helps Plant 300 Trees for Arbor Day

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


A huge crowd gathered in Grand Rapids to plant trees at Mayor Bliss’ Greening Initiative.  Friends of Grand Rapids Parks organized the Arbor Day event to plant 300 trees in a west side neighborhood.




ITC Helps Plant 300 Trees for Arbor Day

A huge crowd gathered in Grand Rapids to plant trees at Mayor Bliss’ Greening Initiative.  Friends of Grand Rapids Parks organized the Arbor Day event to plant 300 trees in a west side neighborhood.



ITC Helps Plant 300 Trees for Arbor Day

A huge crowd gathered in Grand Rapids to plant trees at Mayor Bliss’ Greening Initiative.  Friends of Grand Rapids Parks organized the Arbor Day event to plant 300 trees in a west side neighborhood.


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MiSci and ITC Team Up for Distance Learning Program

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


ITC Vice President of Engineering Joe Bennett teamed up with the Michigan Science Center (MiSci) for a special Arbor Day lesson on trees and power lines, engineers and STEM careers, and environmental stewardship. The program was completed through ECHO, part of the Science Center’s Traveling Science program. ECHO uses video conferencing to connect classrooms from any location with a museum educator who conducts interactive lessons in real time. Nearly 200 Michigan students in 1st through 6th grade joined the online learning program.

“ITC is proud to be a longtime supporter of the Michigan Science Center, and to help bring its programming to the far reaches of the state to communities like Adrian, Grayling, Durand, New Boston, Port Huron and more, which are also served by ITC,” said Bennett. “Furthermore, we know that the budding young scientists, mathematicians and engineers we are inspiring today will develop the energy solutions of the future.”

During the interactive event, Joe explained the “zones” of planting trees in the vicinity of electric transmission lines and hosted a game show style activity where the students submitted their answers to questions about trees. Joe also answered many questions from the students – such as where he went to school, what kind of engineer he is, and how electricity gets from the generators to their homes and schools.

ECHO content is aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), a new set of national science standards designed to help students achieve a cohesive understanding of science over time. ECHO combines technology and hands-on elements to engage students and transform how they learn. The program is made possible by a $300,000 donation from ITC. Listen to the podcast.




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MiSci and ITC Team Up for Distance Learning Program

ITC Vice President of Engineering Joe Bennett teamed up with the Michigan Science Center (MiSci) for a special Arbor Day lesson on trees and power lines, engineers and STEM careers, and environmental stewardship. The program was completed through ECHO, part of the Science Center’s Traveling Science program. ECHO uses video conferencing to connect classrooms from any location with a museum educator who conducts interactive lessons in real time. Nearly 200 Michigan students in 1st through 6th grade joined the online learning program.

“ITC is proud to be a longtime supporter of the Michigan Science Center, and to help bring its programming to the far reaches of the state to communities like Adrian, Grayling, Durand, New Boston, Port Huron and more, which are also served by ITC,” said Bennett. “Furthermore, we know that the budding young scientists, mathematicians and engineers we are inspiring today will develop the energy solutions of the future.”

During the interactive event, Joe explained the “zones” of planting trees in the vicinity of electric transmission lines and hosted a game show style activity where the students submitted their answers to questions about trees. Joe also answered many questions from the students – such as where he went to school, what kind of engineer he is, and how electricity gets from the generators to their homes and schools.

ECHO content is aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), a new set of national science standards designed to help students achieve a cohesive understanding of science over time. ECHO combines technology and hands-on elements to engage students and transform how they learn. The program is made possible by a $300,000 donation from ITC. Listen to the podcast.



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MiSci and ITC Team Up for Distance Learning Program

ITC Vice President of Engineering Joe Bennett teamed up with the Michigan Science Center (MiSci) for a special Arbor Day lesson on trees and power lines, engineers and STEM careers, and environmental stewardship. The program was completed through ECHO, part of the Science Center’s Traveling Science program. ECHO uses video conferencing to connect classrooms from any location with a museum educator who conducts interactive lessons in real time. Nearly 200 Michigan students in 1st through 6th grade joined the online learning program.

“ITC is proud to be a longtime supporter of the Michigan Science Center, and to help bring its programming to the far reaches of the state to communities like Adrian, Grayling, Durand, New Boston, Port Huron and more, which are also served by ITC,” said Bennett. “Furthermore, we know that the budding young scientists, mathematicians and engineers we are inspiring today will develop the energy solutions of the future.”

During the interactive event, Joe explained the “zones” of planting trees in the vicinity of electric transmission lines and hosted a game show style activity where the students submitted their answers to questions about trees. Joe also answered many questions from the students – such as where he went to school, what kind of engineer he is, and how electricity gets from the generators to their homes and schools.

ECHO content is aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), a new set of national science standards designed to help students achieve a cohesive understanding of science over time. ECHO combines technology and hands-on elements to engage students and transform how they learn. The program is made possible by a $300,000 donation from ITC. Listen to the podcast.


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ITC Conducts Aerial Patrols Ahead of Summer Season

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


This spring ITC conducted its semi-annual aerial patrols of the high-voltage transmission towers and lines in Michigan. The helicopter patrols are conducted to provide an overall status of the overhead transmission system that is operated by ITC’s Michigan operating entities, ITCTransmission and Michigan Electric Transmission Company, LLC (METC). They include inspections of steel towers, wood poles, conductors (wires), insulators and other equipment. Crews check for damaged or worn equipment and vegetation hazards. These patrols are a North American Electrical Reliability Corporation (NERC) requirement for ITC’s vegetation management program, support proactive maintenance objectives, and are in line with the company’s model for operational excellence.




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ITC Conducts Aerial Patrols Ahead of Summer Season

This spring ITC conducted its semi-annual aerial patrols of the high-voltage transmission towers and lines in Michigan. The helicopter patrols are conducted to provide an overall status of the overhead transmission system that is operated by ITC’s Michigan operating entities, ITCTransmission and Michigan Electric Transmission Company, LLC (METC). They include inspections of steel towers, wood poles, conductors (wires), insulators and other equipment. Crews check for damaged or worn equipment and vegetation hazards. These patrols are a North American Electrical Reliability Corporation (NERC) requirement for ITC’s vegetation management program, support proactive maintenance objectives, and are in line with the company’s model for operational excellence.



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ITC Conducts Aerial Patrols Ahead of Summer Season

This spring ITC conducted its semi-annual aerial patrols of the high-voltage transmission towers and lines in Michigan. The helicopter patrols are conducted to provide an overall status of the overhead transmission system that is operated by ITC’s Michigan operating entities, ITCTransmission and Michigan Electric Transmission Company, LLC (METC). They include inspections of steel towers, wood poles, conductors (wires), insulators and other equipment. Crews check for damaged or worn equipment and vegetation hazards. These patrols are a North American Electrical Reliability Corporation (NERC) requirement for ITC’s vegetation management program, support proactive maintenance objectives, and are in line with the company’s model for operational excellence.


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Preventing Oak Wilt

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2


Oak wilt is a fungal disease that affects oak trees by impairing the flow of water and nutrients between the tree’s canopy and roots, causing infected trees’ leaves to wilt and turn brown. This disease kills thousands of oak trees each year in forests and commu­nities throughout Michigan.

As a good steward of the environment, ITC’s vegetation management program is aligned with industry best practices to prevent the spread of the disease:


  • ITC observes the Michigan Department of Natural Resources moratorium on the tree work on all oak species from April 15 - August 1. Exceptions may be made in situations to restore service or address safety concerns.
  • Oak trees that must be pruned or removed are treated with an industry approved sealant within a few minutes of cutting.
  • Additionally, all pruning tools will be cleaned with 10% bleach solution or Lysol between sites and/or trees.

Visit the Michigan Oak Wilt Coalition for more information.

 



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Preventing Oak Wilt

Oak wilt is a fungal disease that affects oak trees by impairing the flow of water and nutrients between the tree’s canopy and roots, causing infected trees’ leaves to wilt and turn brown. This disease kills thousands of oak trees each year in forests and commu­nities throughout Michigan.

As a good steward of the environment, ITC’s vegetation management program is aligned with industry best practices to prevent the spread of the disease:


  • ITC observes the Michigan Department of Natural Resources moratorium on the tree work on all oak species from April 15 - August 1. Exceptions may be made in situations to restore service or address safety concerns.
  • Oak trees that must be pruned or removed are treated with an industry approved sealant within a few minutes of cutting.
  • Additionally, all pruning tools will be cleaned with 10% bleach solution or Lysol between sites and/or trees.

Visit the Michigan Oak Wilt Coalition for more information.

 


hidden

Preventing Oak Wilt

Oak wilt is a fungal disease that affects oak trees by impairing the flow of water and nutrients between the tree’s canopy and roots, causing infected trees’ leaves to wilt and turn brown. This disease kills thousands of oak trees each year in forests and commu­nities throughout Michigan.

As a good steward of the environment, ITC’s vegetation management program is aligned with industry best practices to prevent the spread of the disease:


  • ITC observes the Michigan Department of Natural Resources moratorium on the tree work on all oak species from April 15 - August 1. Exceptions may be made in situations to restore service or address safety concerns.
  • Oak trees that must be pruned or removed are treated with an industry approved sealant within a few minutes of cutting.
  • Additionally, all pruning tools will be cleaned with 10% bleach solution or Lysol between sites and/or trees.

Visit the Michigan Oak Wilt Coalition for more information.

 

ITC Michigan Newsletter 2018 Q2